Intern Fact Check

In recent years, Intern Labor Rights has compiled source material on the current state of internships, and especially unpaid internships, including studies, surveys, a book, news articles and more. Please share the images below.

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Source: Strategic National Arts Alumni Project (SNAAP), The Internship Divide: The Promise and Challenges of Internships in the Arts, Alexandre Frenette and others, 2015. See Tables 1 and 2, Page 6; and Figure 6, page 16.

 

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Source: Strategic National Arts Alumni Project (SNAAP), The Internship Divide: The Promise and Challenges of Internships in the Arts, Alexandre Frenette and others, 2015. See Table 5, page 9.

 

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“Only 5% of interns come from developing countries (low HDI) whereas 80% come from countries with high HDI.”

Source: The Lancet, Equitable access for global health internships: insights and strategies at WHO headquarters, 2014.
“According to the latest UN staff data available, for the year 2012-13, 4,018 unpaid interns worked across all the agency’s departments, 68% of whom were women.”

Source: The Guardian, UN employed more than 4,000 unpaid interns in 2012-13, figures show, 2015.

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Source: INTERN BRIDGE, The Debate Over Unpaid College Internships, 2010.

 

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“To earn the money to pay for the internship credits, students often have to work a second (and even third) job. Information obtained from students who were in unpaid internships at the time of the survey revealed that 75% were also working a second job for pay in order to cover college expenses and the credits for their unpaid internship.”

Source: INTERN BRIDGE, The Debate Over Unpaid College Internships, 2010.

“Only 7.7% of colleges and universities offer financial assistance to students participating in unpaid internship experiences.”

Source: “Intern Bridge 2012 National Internship Salary Survey Results to Be Released,” February 07, 2013.

 

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“NACE’s 2013 Student Survey found that 63.1 percent of paid interns received at least one job offer. In comparison, only 37 percent of unpaid interns got an offer; that’s not much better than results for those with no internship—35.2 percent received at least one job offer.

In terms of starting salary, too, paid interns did significantly better than other job applicants: The median starting salary for new grad with paid internship experience is $51,930—far outdistancing their counterparts with an unpaid internship ($35,721) or no internship experience ($37,087).

Note: All data in this release are for bachelor’s degree level graduating seniors who reported applying for a job before graduation.”

Source: College Recruiter, William Frierson, “Class of 2013: Paid Interns Outpace Unpaid Peers in Job Offers, Salaries,” June 18, 2013.

The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) Survey for the Class of 2014 indicates that the numbers continue to fall in a similar range:

‘“Students who have had a paid internship are much more likely to have received a job offer than those students whose work experience has been in an unpaid internship,” the report said, noting that 65.4 percent of the class of 2014 who had completed a paid internship at a for-profit company received a job offer prior to graduation.

In contrast, only 39.5 percent of students who had unpaid internships received a job offer, slightly higher than the offer rate for students with no internship experience at all (38.6 percent).’

Source: US News & World Report, Andrew Soergel, “Paid Interns More Likely to Get Hired,” May 5, 2015.

 

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“Students with incomes less than $40,000 were more likely to be in unpaid internships with non-profit organizations”

“Low income students have a much higher level of participation in unpaid internships than students from high income families. It appears that high income students are more likely to be engaged in internships, regardless if they are paid or unpaid, with for-profit companies. They have very low participation in internships with non-profits organizations and government agencies.”

Source: INTERN BRIDGE, The Debate Over Unpaid College Internships, 2010.

 

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Organizations save some $2 billion annually by not paying interns the minimum wage to which they’re legally entitled. Interns appear to be replacing full-time workers in many situations.

Source: Intern Nation: Earning Nothing and Learning Little in the Brave New Economy, Ross Perlin, Verso 2012.

 

Intern Labor Rights aims to raise awareness to the exploitation of unpaid laborers. We have experienced firsthand the detrimental effects of a practice whereby workers contribute to their employers’ success but receive no wages in compensation.